Tag Archives: Odeon

Daily Cinema Digest – Monday 18 August 2014

James Holmes

Cinemark will also be on trial for the deaths resulting from the shooting and killing of 12 people by alleged mass-killer James Holmes, after a Colorado judge threw out Cinemark’s attempt to have the wrongful death and personal injury lawsuits dismissed.

U.S. District Judge R. Brooke Jackson on Friday rejected a motion for summary judgment filed by lawyers for Texas-based Cinemark USA to dismiss the lawsuits.

Nearly 30 victims or the families of those killed or wounded in the rampage have sued Cinemark, owner of the theater complex where the massacre took place.

In general, the lawsuits claim Cinemark had lax security at its theater in the Denver suburb of Aurora when a gunman opened fired during a midnight screening of the Batman film “The Dark Knight Rises.”  LINK

Cineplex adults-only VIP cinema

Cineplex has opened Canada’s first adults-only multiplex. I wonder if it is also a way to get around liquor licence restrictions, as booze is served there, since no underage are admitted. But Cineplex has long been a pioneer, including supposedly the first one to introduce the concept of VIP cinema in Canada 15 years ago.

Cineplex VIP Cinemas Don Mills, Canada’s first theatre built just for 19-plus audiences, opened Friday in the former McNally Robinson Booksellers at the Shops at Don Mills.

The theatre, its adult status born of being licenced for beer, wine and liquor, has five auditoriums with reserved seating in oversized chairs with extra legroom — including two rooms with oversized faux leather seats that recline at the touch of a button and Dolby Atmos digital surround sound. There’s also valet parking.

“There’s a feeling of feeling of intimacy. You feel like it’s a special environment,” said Ellis Jacob, president and CEO of Cineplex Entertainment of the outlet he calls “the most refined movie theatre in North America.”  LINK

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Daily Cinema Digest – Thursday 24 July 2014

Sex Tape header

The summer isn’t over but already it seems that last rites and post-mortem are being performed on what has been a disappointing box office season, at least in the US. Thank goodness there is China and other emerging markets to cheer up Hollywood, though this is cold comfort for US-based exhibitors. Apparently its men’s fault for staying away in droves.

Less than six weeks before Labor Day, hopes for recovery at the North American summer box office have evaporated. The season is expected to finish down 15 to 20 percent compared with 2013, the worst year-over-year decline in three decades, and revenue will struggle to crack $4 billion, which hasn’t happened in eight years. As a result, analysts predict that the full year is facing a deficit of 4 to 5 percent.

And

Although there have been no Lone Ranger-size debacles, for the first time since 2001 no summer pic will cross $300 million domestically (X-Men: Days of Future Past, Maleficent and Transformers: Age of Extinction hover near $230 million). May kicked off with The Amazing Spider-Man 2 earning $200 million less domestically than 2013′s Iron Man 3; by July 20, the divide had swelled to nearly $690 million as revenue topped out at $2.71 billion, down 20 percent compared with the same period last year.  LINK

Could it be partly because US ticket prices are up compared to Q1 this year (but down compared to Q4’13)?

The average cost of going to the cinema in the U.S. rose to $8.33 in the second quarter of 2014 as the summer season kicked into high gear, according to the National Association of Theater Owners.

That’s up from $7.96 in the first quarter of the year, when there were fewer 3D tentpoles.
However, it was notably down from the second quarter of 2013, when the average movie ticket price clocked in at $8.38 (the reason for the year-over-year decline could include fewer 3D tickets being bought overall as the appetite for the format wanes).  LINK

 Screen Australia chief executive Graeme Mason

Australia - Federal budget cuts means that Screen Australia has to cut staff by one-tenth and decrease funding for cinema-related projects.

Chief executive Graeme Mason has announced plans to save more than $5 million this financial year, including up to $3 million in development and production investment and another $1 million by cutting staff from 112 to 100.

Faced with a $38 million cut over four years in the May budget, Screen Australia will also reduce what it spends to help a film’s cinema release – so-called ”print and advertising” support – and end direct funding of such industry training organisations as Sydney’s Metro Screen, Melbourne’s Open Channel and Adelaide’s Media Resource Centre.  LINK

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Daily Cinema Digest – Wednesday 2 July 2014

Cinema Popcorn Buckets

Here is some interesting and much needed research into the study of nutrition and eating habits of cinema goers. Dr. Rachel Crockett, Senior Research Fellow at London’s University of Greenwich Faculty of Education & Health, led the research that resulted in the “The impact of nutritional labels and socioeconomic status on energy intake: An experimental field study,” has been published in the international journal Appetite

People munching popcorn in a cinema don’t change their eating habits whether the snacks are labelled high fat, low fat or not labelled at all, even if they are concerned about their weight, according to a new study led by the University of Greenwich.

But add in a third factor – the socioeconomic background of eaters – and some quirky results emerge. When concerned eaters of higher status saw the low fat label, it made them eat more than their unconcerned counterparts.

Labels had the opposite effect on concerned popcorn lovers of lower status: they ate less of the low fat snack – and less of the high fat snack. But they did tuck in as normal to the unlabelled tub. LINK

Business

Germany: The German cinema trade body AG Kino-Gilde weighs in on the day-and-date release debate in an article with the headline “AG Cinema Guild makes front against distorted picture of Day & Date experiments”. But as so often the article/interview with Christian Bräuer is behind a pay-wall, so we only get teased with the intro paragraph. Obviously AG Kino-Gilde do not want this discussion to be widely read.

The pros and cons of the ultimately unsuccessful experiment of “Love Steaks” is discussed passionately in the industry (and beyond). It was repeatedly in this context recently that Thomas Paris wrote about the first wave of the EU-funded evaluation experiments that led the field, but it was limited in general to that excerpt that… LINK

Germany: Also behind the same paywall is the six-month figures for German cinemas. Not encouraging reading, based on the headline, with an eight per cent fall year-on-year according to data from Rentrak.

Rund acht Prozent Minus im deutschen Kinomarkt. Zum Ende des ersten Halbjahres steht laut Rentrak beim deutschen Boxoffice ein Minus von rund acht procent. LINK

Annette Mischke, Reinhard Abitz and Lars Baumgart

(From left): Annette Mischke, Reinhard Abitz and Lars Baumgart

An award has been handed out to the most outstanding small German cinema in the state of Schleswig-Holstein and the prize goes to the Savoy Cinema in Borderholm. It is good to see local government valuing their small cinemas and recognizing them as important centres for the wider community. Something for others to copy. AG Kino has a full list of all the honourable mentions.

In noble ambience and adorned with lots of socializing in a happy gathering yesterday evening 100 cineastes celebrated the awarding of the cinema prize to Schleswig-Holstein in Bordesholmer Savoy. In addition to 18 other winners from the entire country the team led by Lars Baumgart Schulstraße won one of the coveted awards. Nineteen cinemas won 18 prizes with a total of 27,500 euros.

The Savoy Cinema hosted the event because in the past year it had won 3500 euros in prizes. The Prize 2013 went to Bordesholm, because there is much more on offer than you can expect for a small place actually.

What makes a good cinema? The selection of films plays not only a role, even width effect, public relations and the atmosphere in the rows in front of the big screen also play a role. As well the Savoy is multi-function venue which scored a few points, especially after its rebirth in 1998 when the house was nearing the end and was revived by the initiative of many citizens. LINK

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Daily Cinema Digest – Friday 6 June 2014

children in cinema

“Everybody talks about the weather, but nobody does anything about it,” Mark Twain once said. Is the same true for declining cinema youth attendance? Not in France, which is making sure that the next generation values and keeps the ’7th Art’ alive in cinemas.

To overcome this drop and respond quickly to the first problem, exhibitors have at the beginning of the year set a single price of 4 euros for children under the age of 14. The operation caused some gnashing of teeth from the distributors, who have seen their revenues decline. It nevertheless proved a success, and contributes greatly to the revival of attendance in the last six months.

More fundamentally, the education aspect of cinema is subject to multiple touches. A report commissioned by the CNC has been finalized. Directed by Xavier Lardoux, Deputy Director General of Unifrance (Support Association of French cinema export), he advocates through 10 measures, the establishment of a genuine European policy for film education.

The author of the report considers educating young audiences about the 7 th art to be both a political and an economic necessity. “When we see a French child spends more time in front of a screen, whatever it is, at school, and that children are facing more and more young people in these screens, learning how to watch should be taught earlier. As for the economic aspect, it is about creating the spectators of tomorrow for European cinema, which is a major industry,” Xavier Lardoux said.  LINK

Cocteau cinema Game of Thrones

Calling the theatrical platform ‘the largest pay-per-view platform in the world’, Cinemark’s CEO Tim Warner calls for big shows like HBO’s “Game of Thrones” and episodes of “The Voice” to be shown in cinemas. Give the success of TV events like “Dr Who: The Day of the Doctors” even in the US, it would be more surprising if he didn’t call for cinemas to have access to such premium content.

“‘Game of Thrones’ on the big screen would be so exciting,” Warner said. “It’s not that you can’t go to the bar and watch this stuff, but you can’t have that premium experience.”

However, studios may need to become more collaborative. Structurally, media conglomerates tend to run their television and film arms separately without allowing for much overlap.

“They’re going to have break down that barrier within the studios, so that all the content providers take a look at whatever content they’re doing and say, ‘Should this be going into this platform?’” Warner said.  LINK

If nothing else, it gives credence to Quentin Tarantino’s recent rant that “Digital projection, that’s just television in public.” And “Game of Thrones” did screen in one particular cinema.

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London Cinemas’ Food Hygiene Scorecard: Quite Good, but Room For Improvement

Westminster London cinemas hygiene scorcard

With cinema attendance plateauing or stagnant in most developed markets, exhibitors are turning to ways to extract more money from the patrons that still frequent cinemas. Concessions is the most obvious way, which is why the last decade has seen a proliferation of in-theatre cafes, bars, stand-alone ice-cream counters, gourmet food and cinema-dining.

While price is still the major complaint for most cinema goers, with sugar, trans-fats and GMO issues only starting to bubble up, should cinema goers in fact be more concerned with food safety? The recent reporting of cockroaches in a Cineworld near Manchester led to questions about food safety practices in major UK cinemas.

To get to the bottom of the issue, Celluloid Junkie filed a Freedom of Information (FoI) request with London’s Westminster Council for all documents relating to food safety issues in central London cinemas for the past four years. The findings were reassuringly positive with overall high standard. However, not all exhibitors scored equally highly and historically there have been  lows. Our findings might still surprise you.

Scores on the Doors

The details about the food hygiene standards that we received from Westminster Council are neither a secret nor should they come as a surprise. With Westminster depending on tourists and Londoners spending billions of pounds (yes, billions) each year in the shops, bars, restaurants, theatres (plays and musicals) and cinemas, the council has a particularly high interest in ensuring that strict standards are being observed.

This is not to say that other councils might be more lax, but that Westminster is unique in the the whole of the UK in terms of acting as a magnet for bar, club, restaurant, cinema and theatre goers.

Westminster cinemas also have the UK’s highest ticket prices (Leicester Square ones in particular), but are also the ‘red carpet’ cinemas, so they occupy a special position in the UK cinema pantheon.

As such Westminster Council was an obvious participant in the Scores on the Doors scheme, whereby its 1-5 ratings is posted on a certificate to be displayed prominently, as well as on the website. Unlike the Westminster Council documents released to us, however, it does not a provide a detailed breakdown and only covers the most recent inspection.

A Few Caveat To Begin With

There are several things to be noted before we analyse the figures and findings. First of all, this is not a survey of all the cinemas in London but only those in Westminster Council in the centre of London. Health & Safety is a Council matter in the UK and while UK cities like Leeds or Glasgow have councils that more or less cover the whole city, London is split into many boroughs and councils. Westminster is the most central and with the highest cinema density in London, including the famous Leicester Square in the West End.

This means not all London cinemas are included and there is a slight imbalance in the exhibitors represented. Odeon has no less than four cinemas included, but Vue only one as the two Westfield Vues and also the O2 lie in other boroughs. Westminster does not even include all of central London cinemas, with Odeon Covent Garden just one block away from Curzon Soho, but in the Borough of Camden. It would not have been practical to get information from all London councils as there are 32 boroughs in the Greater London area, plus the self-governing City of London, which houses the Barbican cinema.

Secondly, it should be noted that the survey were conducted at different times and are not an annually recurring event. Inspections which result in a low score or major recommendations usually see a follow up, but a cinema that scores well is usually not re-visited for a few years. We have thus taken the last four years into consideration, averaging scores but also recognising the most recent scores as the most relevant in practical terms.

Top of the Class: Prince Charles and Apollo

The highest score of any cinemas in Westminster was given to the Prince Charles Cinema and the former Apollo Haymarket, who both got five out of five in 2012.

The former might be a surprise but is a testament to a well run small independent cinemas. Situated on a narrow pedestrian street behind Leicester Square, the Prince Charles Cinema specialises in showing older film at a discount price, as well as specials like Rocky Horror Show or Sing-along Sound of Music and festivals and themed screenings. Comments that were made were of a minor nature, such as bag of popcorn stored on the floor of the storeroom, which is a no-no for any food.

Apollo Haymarket is part of the boutique mini-multiplex chain acquired by Vue in 2013. While the cinema has re-branded and is now Vue Haymarket, at the time of the inspection it was still Apollo Haymarket. With a focus on bar, cafe and high-end snacks, it is good to see that the then Apollo’s attention to detail extended to all aspects of health and safety when it comes to concessions. We trust that this has continued as part of Vue. Comments were minor points; again popcorn bags stored on the floor and the ice scoop left lying on top of the ice.

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Daily Cinema Digest – Thursday 24 April 2014

YouTube Preview Image

In something other than sad news from South Korea, enhanced experience cinema seat maker CJ 4DPlex has revealed its global ambitions and roadmap.

To many movie fans, “300” is a Hollywood blockbuster about an epic battle between the Spartans and the Persians. But for CJ 4DPlex, the number has a different yet significant meaning.

For the CJ affiliate, 300 is the number of theaters worldwide in which it hopes to deploy its 4-D technology called 4DX that offers a new experience for moviegoers.

“We are going to hit critical mass once our 4-D technology platform is adopted at more than 300 theaters globally by the first half of next year,” CJ 4DPlex CEO Choi Byung-hwan told The Korea Herald.  LINK

CJ 4DPlex wants 4DX to become a major cinema brand like Imax and drive added revenue for exhibitors.

The idea of 4DX came from CJ Group chairman Lee Jay-hyun, who suggested CJ CGV integrate the concept and technology of theme park rides with cinemas to offer a different movie experience.

This came as the theater market has been facing strong competition from the home entertainment sector.

Lee’s 4-D insight was also in line with his vision for CJ’s media and culture globalization, which was to encourage global consumers to watch one to two Korean movies a year; eat Korean food at least twice a month, watch one to two Korean soap operas a week; and listen to one to two K-pop songs a day.

Here is another video that explains the technology in more depth (that I’m unable to embed).

ArcLight Santa Monica

USA (CA): The go-ahead has been given to one of the two ArcLight cinemas proposed for Santa Monica.

Council voted quickly and unanimously to approve the first new Downtown Santa Monica movie theater in decades.

An ArcLight Cinema with 10 to 13 screens and up to 1,500 seats will be built on the third level of the Santa Monica Place mall and could be completed by next year.

Council also voted unanimously to move forward in negotiations aimed at placing another larger ArcLight on Fourth Street where Parking Structure 3 currently sits.  LINK

Concessions (not the snack kind) made include a USD $120,000 contribution to the pedestrian Colorado Esplanade, funding Downtown wayfinding signage, closed caption devices at all its theaters, three screens made available for AFM and local hiring of staff.

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Daily Cinema Digest – Tuesday 8 April 2014

Imax China

Imax is to sell 20% of its China business to two Chinese-based entities in return for USD $80 million and a firmer foot hold in the world’s soon-to-be largest cinema market.

IMAX Chief Executive Richard Gelfond said in an interview that investment fund China Media Capital and private-equity firm FountainVest Partners would pay $40 million each for 10% stakes by early 2015. He said the deal gives IMAX local partners who will open up expansion opportunities in one of its most important markets.

The investors will shepherd a public offering of shares of the China operation, IMAX China Holding Inc., in the next five years, Mr. Gelfond said. IMAX China will be paying IMAX Corp. an ongoing trademark and licensing fee for the right to use the IMAX trademark in China, a spokeswoman said. IMAX China is aiming to list in Hong Kong but will be positioning itself to list on other China exchanges, such as in Shanghai, in case that doesn’t work out or a better opportunity arises on the mainland, a spokeswoman said.  LINK

Not only will this allow for expansion in China, but Imax must also be hoping to neutralise the nascent threat from CFGS - though this is not mentioned in the above article.

NAB

Barco laser projection

USA (LV): Lasers are coming! This follow-up article from David Keene provides excellent insights from the pre-NAB Cinema Summit on what is happening on the laser front.

The first shots were fired on Saturday, in the session “Laser Illuminated Projectors: What’s New and When Will They Arrive? Bill Beck, President of BTM Consulting moderated panelists Pete Ludé, CTO of Mission Rock Digital; Goran Stojmenovik , Product Manager Laser Projection, Barco; Richard McPherson of NEC Display Solutions; and Don Shaw, Senior Director of Product Management for Entertainment Solutions at Christie.

The panel was straight forward– not your typical panel involving a lot of speculation and vague talk of coming solutions. It was three major projector manufactures explaining their new Laser projectors. And surprisingly, this was not a “me too” exercise: each company is launching a very different kind of Laser projector and/or 3D solution into the market this spring.  LINK

You Will Be Amazed To Find Out What The Differences Between The Different Laser Projector Solutions Are!

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CinemaCon 2014: Press Release Roundup

CinemaCon Logo

PLEASE NOTE: If we missed any individual press release it was not done purposefully. If you would like us to include a CinemaCon related press announcement in a future roundup, please forward it to tips@celluloidjunkie.com.

Historically companies and organizations doing business at trade shows and conferences have relied heavily upon press releases to get their message out to an industry. This has been especially true at CinemaCon and ShoWest before it. This year was no different.

The first day of the show always sees a flurry of announcements “hit the wire”. As the week (and convention) progresses the number of releases tends to dwindle. We thought it might be useful to sum up all of the announcements made at this year’s show, and when appropriate, provide a bit of insight or analysis. Here are the releases published during CinemaCon 2014 listed in alphabetical order by company name:


Arts Alliance Media
The London based digital cinema integrator and software developer is is always good for a few releases during industry trade shows. CinemaCon saw them release no fewer than four. The first announced the launch of a new software solution called AdFuser. The software was designed for all aspects of on-screen cinema advertising. The software is capable of planning campaigns and managing inventory, targeting ads to appropriate genres or audience demographics, automated ad playlist creation, ad content delivery, reporting and much more. AdFuser can be used in either an extremely granular or completely automated fashion.

Our Take: AAM’s cinema advertising software has been in development for years so it is interesting to see them finally launch the product. We have yet to have a close demonstration of the solution, but look forward to seeing it in action. The company is entering a niche market with a stiff competitor (Unique Digital) that has more than a decade head start in the space.

AAM announced a software deal with Vox Cinemas, a cinema chain based in the Middle East. The circuit will be employing AAM’s suite of software to manage their digital cinema technology and operations. This includes solutions such as Screenwriter Plus (Theatre Management System), Producer (Enterprise Circuit Management System) and Locksmith (Enterprise KDM Management) and Lifeguard (NOC Tools). Vox operates 9 complexes which account for 92 screens in Lebanon and the UAE.

Finnkino was already using AAM’s theatre management system (TMS) and will now upgrade to Screenwriter Plus, which has additional features for automation and monitoring. The circuit will rollout the new version of Screenwriter Plus throughout their 14 sites and at a later date has the option to include their 11 Forum Cinemas located in the Baltic.

AAM began as a digital cinema integrator with their own virtual print fees (VPFs) in Europe. They have now entered the complicated Latin American market with a series of partners, most recently Quanta-DGT. The trio announced three deals for VPF rollouts with three exhibitors in Uruguay; Grupo Cine, Life Cinemas and Movie.

Our Take: This agreement is a perfect example of just how complex Latin America can be for the motion picture business. While the combined 61 screens covered in the contract already have digital cinema equipment installed, these screens will now fall under AAM/Quanta-DGT’s VPF agreements.


Barco
CinemaBarcoThe Belgian based projector manufacturer was incredibly active during this year’s CinemaCon, showing up at the conference with half a dozen press releases. Many of the notices centered around their new CinemaBarco initiative, specifically the 60,000-lumen laser projector the company is bringing to market. The projector is DCI-compliant and capable of showing 4K content all the way up to 60 frames per second. The Barco 6P laser projector is capable of showing 3D content in 4K at 14 ftL and is fully integrated within the DCI-compliant projector. It will be commercially available immediately in the United States and China before being distributed in the rest of the world by the end of 2014. The company demonstrated the projector at CinemaCon without a “shaking” screen.

To prove just how market ready their laser projector is, Barco announced that Cinemark would be the first exhibitor to install the new technology. The release didn’t specify precisely which sites Barco would be installing its high-tech projector in, though don’t be surprised if Cinemark Century 16 South Point and XD winds up being the first. That’s the Las Vegas cinema in which Barco was conducting off-site demonstrations of its laser projector during CinemaCon.

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UK Cinemas Are High Profile Targets For Anti-Sugar Campaigns

concession table UK

Calorie and sugar levels in UK cinema snacks

Having looked at challenges facing United States exhibitors relating to carbonated sugar beverages (Cinema’s Dangerous Addiction to Sodas), it is now time to examine the situation in the United Kingdom. The issue has come to the forefront with an article in the Daily Mail’s This Is Money section titled “The 35 teaspoons of sugar in a box of cinema popcorn: Cinemas slammed over supersized snacks“. The piece highlights the amounts of sugar found in the concessions offering of the UK’s Big Three (Cineworld, Odeon and Vue).

Coming hot on the heels of the new recommendations from the World Health Organization (WHO) to cut daily intake of sugar by half, the statistics in the Daily Mail’s article make for sobering reading. Effectively a UK cinema goer could consume his or her entire weekly sugar “allowance” in just one cinema visit, if they buy a soda and a popcorn. From the article:

A 200 gram box of toffee popcorn at Cineworld comes in at 840 calories and 121 grams of sugar, equivalent to about 30 teaspoons. Adding a 32oz Coca Cola carries an extra 407 calories and 101.2 grams of sugar, or 25 teaspoons.

A large bucket of sweet popcorn at Odeon cinemas amounts to 1,005 calories, which is more than half of a woman’s recommended daily intake. And at Vue, a 200 gram tub of toffee popcorn contains 138.9 grams of sugar, which is equivalent to about 35 teaspoons.

UK’s Weight Watchers has thrown its, um, weight behind this criticism, with a call to ban ‘super sized’ serving portions, as part of its ‘Slim Our Snacks’ campaign. Quoted in The Mirror:

Actress Patsy Kensit, 44, who is 9 stone (126 pounds or 57.2 kilos) after shedding 14 pounds with Weight Watchers, said: “The full-sugar fizzy drink and popcorn sizes are ridiculous.”

WeightWatchers’ Zoe Hellman said film fans should not be faced with “blockbuster-sized sugary and fatty foods”.

Cinemagoers Enjoying Concessions

While in the Daily Mail article:

Weight Watchers spokesman Angharad Massie said: ‘Cinemas are inherently family focused spaces, yet we all recognise them to be one of the worst spaces for promoting portions of high fat, salt and sugar snacks with little or no choice of healthier alternatives.’

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Daily Cinema Digest – Fri/Sat 7/8 March 2014

abandonedcinema2

We don’t normally start with a Finally-type of story, but this one is just too amazing to leave to the end. A cinema built and abandoned in the Sinai desert, with a story that is worthy of a film by Werner Herzog or a scene from Lost.

This extraordinary outdoor cinema was captured by Kaupo Kikkas, an award-winning Estonian photographer who explains the story as he heard it. After running it through Google translate from his Estonian website, this is what I gathered from his account of what happened to the abandoned cinema of the Sinai… Firstly, it hasn’t been around that long. Kaupo says it was installed “somewhere in the beginning of this millennium”. And it wasn’t built by Egyptians but rather one crazy Frenchman. As the story goes, this unnamed Frenchman, who likes to smoke a lot of cannabis (and presumably has a bit of money to throw around), was hanging out in the Sinai desert one day with his friends and decided that the one thing the place was missing was … a movie theatre! (Duh).

Be sure to click the LINK to Messy Nessy Chic to see all the photos and read the entire remarkable story.

Digital Death Watch

UK (N. Ireland): East Belfast’s Strand Cinema will be transformed into an arts centre with the help of a £40,000 loan from Ulster Community Investment Trust (UCIT). But what on earth is Chief Executive in right of the picture holding?

The famous art deco building – which incorporated shipyard influences from the nearby Harland & Wolff, including porthole windows and lighting – first opened its doors as a cinema in 1935. Due to a lack of modern projectors, the cinema had not been able to show the newest movies but has now received new projectors, marking the start of a wider refurbishment project combining new technology with the traditional fabric of the building.  LINK

USA: An art-centre in Miami has also upgraded to 2K and surround sound thanks to a grant.

Three years ago, an independent theater called O Cinema opened in the Wynwood Arts District with the hope of bringing independent and foreign films to Miami’s urban core. This year, the theater celebrates its surprising success with new programming and upgrades that will give it a greater sense of permanence in the community. Co-founders Kareem Tabsch and Vivian Marthell had the idea to create what is now O Cinema back in 2008. Thanks in large part to a $400,0000 grant by the Knight Foundation through the Knight Arts Challenge program, they were able to execute their ambitious plans to build an independent theater in Wynwood, but the project was not without difficulties. LINK

Business

USAArcLight Cinema has announced that it will start developing original content for the big screen and the small one (i.e. online).

The L.A.-based luxury cinema chain will co-produce footage of red carpet premieres, press junkets and other behind-the-scenes interviews with people in the industry and feature these clips on its website and in theaters before movie showings. The cinema will also promote the footage on its Twitter account. In February, ArcLight partnered with production company Mid-Century Media, started by former CNN entertainment correspondent JD Cargill, to begin developing the content.  LINK

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