Daily Cinema Digest – Friday 8 August 2014

China online cinema ticket machines

Wondering about the above picture? That’s no less than ten (10!) different ticketing machines in the lobby of a cinema in Beijing. Online ticketing has exploded in China along with the growth of multiplexes, Imax screens and attendance. But it is not what you are used to in the West with one or at most two operators in addition to the cinema handling online ticketing. Different prices and different service levels means that there is a lot of competition in this field, which is only set to grow.

According to Art Consulting released data show that in 2013 Chinese film market grossed 21.7 billion yuan [USD $3.5 billion], the total volume of transactions reached buy movie tickets online 3.64 billion yuan [USD $562 million], accounting for 16.8%; market size of online movie ticket seat selection broke through the 1.2 billion yuan [USD $195 million], accounting for 5.5% of the overall size of the market. 2013 National viewing trips 620 million, of which up to 129 million people online ticketing, accounting for 21%. At the same time, the country has opened online seat selection feature close to 30% of the national cinema theater data.

Insiders predict that the next three years, the national online movie ticket in the domestic share of total box office or over 50%. U.S. group net Xu Wu, director of the opal film products more optimistic data from May this year it seems, online ticket market share has more than 30%, with a few important files and the second half of the summer schedule of the national archives, Lunar New Year stalls, etc. heat the film to enhance the overall market is expected by the end of this year, the national online ticket market share will exceed 50%. “This is an explosive growth in the market, cat’s-eye movies formally launched in January 2013, the sales volume in May this year compared to last year has increased by nearly five times.” Xu Wu said.  LINK

Online ticketing brings convenience such as seat selection and for films such as ‘Transformers 4′ the rate of online tickets sales was a high 40%. Perhaps more interestingly, the avrage ticket price of tickets sold online56 yuan, compared to average national ticket price of 20 yuan, highlighting the domination of sales in multiplexes and Imax/CGF PLF screens in Tier 1 & 2 cities. While online tickets also offers operators the chance to gather data on customers there are fears in the industry of a new round of price wars. Those ticket machines aren’t just fighting for floor space.

9900 Wilshire

USA (CA) - Fresh news that Dalian Wanda, the parent company of US exhibitor AMC, is planning to build a HQ on 9900 Wilshire Boulevard in Beverly Hills. The company has already donated USD $20 million to the AMPAS (Oscar) Museum.

Dalian Wanda Group, which controls the second-largest US cinema chain, won the bid for a piece of land in Los Angeles as the Chinese company sets its sights on Hollywood.

Wanda, the Chinese developer controlled by billionaire Wang Jianlin, plans to invest US$1.2 billion (RM3.85 billion) after beating more than 10 bidders for the 32,000 sq m plot in Beverly Hills, the company said in a statement on its website.

Wanda plans to set up an office in the city and help China’s entry into Hollywood’s film industry, it said.  LINK

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IBC 2014 Big Screen Experience – Q&A With Exec Producer Julian Pinn

 

Douglas Trumbull

Keynote speaker Doug Trumbull (not Julian Pinn)

With digital cinema conversion completed in most of the world, this year the IBC Big Screen Experience (running 12-15 September in Amsterdam’s RAI) has be re-vamped extensively to focus on the latest issues facing the industry. Sessions such as EDCF have been moved from their traditional slot (now Sunday evening, followed by drinks) and new areas of coverage introduced.

Significantly the Big Screen Experience conference strand will be completely free to anyone attending the IBC trade show, which means that anyone can come and hear leading industry experts discussing the issues affecting the industry today and tomorrow at no extra cost. There is also the traditional Hollywood blockbusters, only this year it’s Apes with both Atmos and lasers, also free (thanks to 20th Century Fox) as part of #IBCbigscreen

Celluloid Junkie caught up with industry veteran Julian Pinn (founder and consultant for Julian Pinn Ltd) who is the Executive Producer for this year’s Big Screen conference, to ask him what those planning to attend should make room for in their no-doubt packed IBC diaries.

Celluloid Junkie: This is the first year that IBC’s Big Screen conference stream is free to all attendees of the show, what’s behind this change?

Julian Pinn: For IBC registered delegates, the IBC Big Screen Experience is indeed a free-to-attend programme of carefully curated, editorially lead conference sessions, exhibitor product demonstrations, and Big Screen movies. The minimum IBC registration one needs to gain access to the Big Screen Experience is an Exhibition Visitor Pass, which itself is free if booked before 21 August 2014. This is an initiative by IBC to add value to the overall IBC experience and to remove barriers and complexity to those who are looking to make the most out of their busy schedule during the entirety of IBC2014.

CJ:  Is there a theme running through all the sessions?

JP:  IBC Big Screen in recent years has focussed on the transition to Digital Cinema. With Digital Cinema done and dusted in most parts of the world, this year’s IBC Big Screen conference is looking at the disruption taking place in cinema and the wider industries:

- disruption due to a wealth of scientific innovation that digital has unlocked, and what that means to the artists’ abilities to create new stories and to move their audiences in more powerful ways, and

- disruption due to the new entrants, new commercial realities, and new ways of doing business not only within the cinema business but within the wider industry from big screen to small screens.

CJ:  What new issues and topics will be discussed at this year’s Big Screen?

JP:  Not a quick answer I’m happy to say! The conference kicks off this year on Friday afternoon when we will be asking for the first time if the Big Screen and Second Screens can coexist peacefully and profitably—experiencing first-hand the technologies from Shazam and Cinime.

Saturday will feature a mixture of sponsored sessions, from Red and ARRI, with a couple of editorial sessions new to IBC in recent years. The first is on Event Cinema—a new sector to the business that is predicted to grow to 5% of the overall global cinema box office by 2015; we will be seeing examples and discussing important questions about the challenges of merging the two disciplines of broadcast and cinema from technological, artistic, and commercial perspectives.

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Daily Cinema Digest – Thursday 7 August 2014

Berr in cinema

The City Council of Bristol, Tenn, recently voted 3-2 in favour of allowing beer sales in the local cinema, clearing a first hurdle and in line with a larger national trend.

National Association of Theatre Owners Director of Media and Research Patrick Corcoran said wine, cocktails and suds in the cinema are becoming another selection at the concession stand at theaters across the U.S.

At last count, nearly 900 movie houses — including ones in nearby Asheville and Knoxville — have alcohol alongside the popcorn and Goobers in food vending areas or in restaurants confined within the theater, which allow consumers to take their meals and spirits in to see the show.

“It’s moving more into the mainstream as some of the larger theater companies are getting into it,” Corcoran said. “There’s a growing adult market. The percentage of the older population is growing and theaters are looking for better ways to attract that demographic. One of those is through alcohol sales and dine-in theaters.”  LINK

An interesting footnote is that one Hollywood studio was initially dead set against the idea of beer in cinemas. Have you already guessed which one?

Corcoran said independent movie theaters and larger chains began selling beer and wine in the mid 1990s, leading the Walt Disney Co. to not release its films to some locations because they did not want their family films associated with the sale of alcohol. Disney later relented after sales became successful in those areas with the beer concept.

Cineplex

Canada – Cineplex has announced its quarterly figures and Canada’s largest exhibitor noted year-on-year growth, but it as mainly the in-organic (screen acquisition) kind and the company is not immune to the malaise that is gripping the box office south of the border.

“Total revenue for the second quarter of 2014 increased 7.2%, or $21.9 million compared to the prior year, due largely to the 2013 acquisitions of 24 Atlantic theatres and digital signage company Cineplex Digital Networks,” said Ellis Jacob, President and CEO, Cineplex Entertainment. “The box office was impacted by the underperformance of a number of big summer titles and the shifting of release dates on certain films which resulted in a same store decrease in box office revenues of 4.2%, compared to the prior year quarter.”  LINK

The silver lining was “diversification in related businesses including media, digital commerce, gaming, food service and alternative programming” to counterbalance under-performing films, plus the SCENE loyalty program reached 5.8 million members (an increase of 200,000 members in the quarter).

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Quarterly Results: RealD (Good) and NCM (Not)

RealD logo

We are coming to the end of the current season of quarterly financial results, with RealD and National CineMedia, Inc announcing their respective Q1 2015 and Q2 2014 results. One is good and the other one not so good.

Starting with 3D technology licensing company RealD, the figures should please investors, with a 43% EBITDA year-on-year growth and net income of over USD 5 million. The press release gives the details:

Total revenue was $55.4 million, comprised of license revenue of $36.0 million and product and other revenue of $19.4 million. For the first quarter of fiscal 2014, total revenue was $59.2 million, comprised of license revenue of $37.3 million and product and other revenue of $21.9 million.

China license revenue represented 14% of total worldwide license revenue, up from 8% in the first fiscal quarter of 2014.

GAAP net income attributable to common stockholders was $5.5 million, or $0.10 per share, compared to GAAP net loss attributable to common stockholders of $1.5 million, or $0.03 per diluted share, for the first quarter of fiscal 2014.

The key metrics are interesting in terms of showing RealD weathering a slowdown in North America, both in terms of deployment and box office, with growth in emerging markets more than compensating and in some cases overtaking US/Canada numbers.

  • Estimated box office generated on RealD-enabled screens(1) for the first quarter of fiscal 2015 was $787 million ($387 million domestic, $400 million international). In the first quarter of fiscal 2014, estimated box office generated on RealD-enabled screens was $838 million ($431 million domestic, $407 million international).
  • Ten 3D films were released in the first quarter of fiscal 2015, compared to eight 3D films in the first quarter of fiscal 2014. These figures reflect the number of 3D films released domestically during the periods.
  • International markets generated 63% of license revenue and 34% of product and other revenue in the first quarter of fiscal 2015.
  • As of June 30, 2014, RealD had deployed approximately 25,600 RealD-enabled screens, an increase of 9% from approximately 23,500 screens as of June 30, 2013, and an increase of 400 screens (50 domestic, 350 international), or 2%, from approximately 25,200 screens as of March 31, 2014.
  • As of June 30, 2014, RealD had approximately 13,450 domestic screens at approximately 3,000 domestic theater locations and approximately 12,150 international screens at approximately 3,000 international theater locations.

In the earnings call (transcript by Seeking Alpha, as always) CEO Michael V. Lewis pointed to a 20% cost reduction and significant growth in China, Russia and Latin America as keys to the company’s success in this quarter.

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Daily Cinema Digest – Wednesday 6 August 2014

United Cinema Japan

Often the overlooked cinema major in Asia, the Japanese cinema market is still dynamic, as witnessed by this $100m acquisition of United Cinemas, with its 36 cinema complexes.

Convenience store operator Lawson Inc. announced Wednesday it will acquire United Cinemas Co., a Tokyo-based cinema complex operator, in a deal estimated at more than ¥10 billion [USD $97.9 million].

Lawson will buy all shares in the holding company of United Cinema from the existing shareholders, including private equity fund Advantage Partners LLP.

Lawson sells entertainment tickets and music and video software through Tokyo-based subsidiary Lawson HMV Entertainment Inc.

Following the acquisition, goods now handled at the Lawson stores and through the Lawson HMV service will be sold at United Cinema complexes. Lawson will also launch campaigns involving both the retail and cinema operations.  LINK

Sun Xiaobin

China - The Chinese are hard at work developing their own laser light cinema projector technology AND immersive audio technology. We’ve written about this company before and it is worth keeping your eyes on them.

In the end of 2013, Chen Xing Technology launched worldwide pioneered laser giant screen showing the overall high quality solutions Cinelab laser DMR program uses these “future technology.” In this scenario, Chen Xing laser giant screen all equipped with RealD 3D systems in the 21-meter-wide common metal curtain achieve ultra-high brightness 3D 9 FL, in order to set a new benchmark for the industry, providing data and technical practice experience, through Cinelab laser DMR’s 3P laser projection system, people will eventually be able to watch the show to meet the brightness level of quality 3D movies.  LINK

If making a laser projection Imax-like 4K projector wasn’t enough, they also seem to be hard at work to create a local Chinese version of Dolby Atmos, according to this article.

Cinelab laser IMAX sound system is also new design concept, the most classic Dolby (ATMOS) and Chen Xing Technology panoramic sound technology with independent intellectual property Cinelab super 5.1,15.1 and 17.1 stunning combination of sound, to get rid of the shackles of sources, perfect interpretation of Dolby (ATMOS) panoramic sound studio truest sound.

Currently Cinelab laser DMR has entered a number of cities in the country, providing excellent viewing experience for fans around. Fuzhou Swiss Wan Star International Studios, for example, changing the first day of release 4, laser DMR Hall box office reached 250,000 yuan, laser DMR Hall 443 full.  LINK

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China Just Invented the Future of Cinema Watching (But Everyone Older Than 30 Will Hate It)

The Legend of Qin - Qin's Moon

This week saw a cinema screening in China that may prove a watershed moment for how films are watched on the big screen. But chances are that unless you are a Millennial, particularly in Asia, you are not going to want to embrace it.

I’ve seen things…

Covering mainland China as a non-Mandarin speaker based in Singapore for me is a bit like watching an outdoor screening of Bladerunner from a neighbouring roof through a pair of binoculars; I can make out most of what is happening, pick up a lot of what is said, though I cannot pretend to understand everything that is going on. But to quote from the films memorable final monologue, “I’ve seen things you people wouldn’t believe.”

Because my perspective, disadvantaged though it may be, provides some fascinating insights into things happening in the Chinese exhibition industry, whether it is bizarre hammer attacks, concession food hygiene scares, Wanda IPO shenanigans or inherent structural market weaknesses - and that’s just in the last two weeks! And like Bladerunner this perspective offers a very real glimpse into the future – of cinema.

Because it is important to remember that the future of cinema does not lie in the west, which only offers stasis or a gentle decline of shrinking older audiences into wider, more comfortable and expensive seats, watching Avengers VII or a Met Opera. That is how THE END of cinema going as we know it plays out in cinema auditoriums everywhere from multiplexes in Manchester to art-houses in Atlanta, observed with gourmet popcorn and a glass of wine in our hand.

Whereas in China and Asia, cinema continue to grow and evolve as a social experience in the non-flickering digital projection light off the Imax/CFG screen. That is where we have to look to understand the future, particularly if we want to remain part of it.

China and Asia – the Cinema Innovators

We don’t need to rehash the already well-established importance of China to the global film and cinema business, whether it’s the gargantuan box office earning of Transformers 4 or the fact that it is the single most important growth market for Imax. What is important is not that China is now the second biggest cinema market in the world – though on uncertain foundations, as we’ve discussed many times before – but that it is a market that is continuing to expand.

This is equally true for the rest of the Far East and Southeast Asia, with the exception of Japan. The cinema business in South Asia is also growing, but with more restrictions, particularly in India where it is hampered by red tape and costly malls. (India also has a different and more traditionalist – not to say conservative – cinema going culture, that is in many way closer to that in the west than in China.)

So when we talk about China, it is often also a shorthand for talking about cinema developments in an arc across Asia that stretches from Seoul/Beijing/Tokyo, down through Singapore/Jakarta/Kuala Lumpur through to Chennai/Islamabad/Dubai.

It is in these markets that we are seeing the greatest innovations when it comes to cinemas. This comes from most of them being under-screened and unencumbered by legacy cinemas and multiplexes with their analogue heritage, as well as having a young population. It is easier to embrace the future if you can build it from scratch than if you have to retrofit it, particularly for audiences that don’t have a fixed concept of what ‘cinema’ should be. Asia is the only continent where the majority of cinemas that have never seen a 35mm print will soon outnumber those that at least once had a film projector. Asia *is* digital cinema.

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Daily Cinema Digest – Tuesday 5 August 2014

Carmike Cinema logo

USA – Carmike has released its quarterly figures and discussed them in a conference call. Overall the company claims to be weathering the downturn pretty well, despite a drop in profits of over 50%, with a strong recent focus on M&As. Here is what S. David Passman III, the company’s President and CEO had to say.

Carmike once again outperformed the overall domestic box office in revenue and attendance during the quarter, which was a challenging period for the U.S. market, due to very strong box office results posted during the second quarter of 2013. Despite the domestic industry decline of almost 7%, Carmike’s admissions revenues actually increased by 7% during the three month period, and our total attendance grew 4%.

On a per screen basis, our box office receipts declined less than 1%. In fact, Carmike’s per screen performance was nearly 600 basis points better than the overall industry. As I have said in the past, while the film slate will vary from quarter-to-quarter, our expanded scale and companywide emphasis on customer service excellence, combined with our growing circuit of high quality theater, remain important factors in our ability to generate favorable operating results over the long term.  LINK

barco_logo

Brazil – Barco is the projector supplier for the recent Doremi/Quanta deal that we wrote about yesterday. Some insights into the market from the press release.

Digital cinema expert Barco is proud to announce that it has recently closed a deal with integrator Quanta DGT to supply 500 digital cinema projectors to theaters in Brazil through a Virtual Print Fee (VPF) financing model. Many of the largest cinema exhibitors – Cinesystem, GNC, Cine Sercla, CineShow, CineArt, AFA Cinemas, PlayArte, Arcoplex, Cinematográfica Araujo – and dozens of small exhibitor groups have chosen to go digital with Barco digital cinema projectors.

While Brazil is the world’s tenth most important cinema market in admissions, the digitization percentage has been quite low for a long time: only around 38% of the 2,500 screens were digitized by the end of 2013. Recent public policies encouraging exhibitors to digitize their screens, including the VPF program, are taking hold and over 70% of the country’s exhibitors have already joined the program. Many of them rely on the support of system integrator Quanta DGT who, together with global digital cinema leader Arts Alliance Media have VPF agreements with the Hollywood studios to fund the rollout of digital cinema across Latin America.  LINK

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Can Filmmakers Really Help Kodak Craft A New Image?

Tired of Hearing Film Is Dead

The long standing uncertainty over the future of 35mm motion picture film was finally laid to rest this past week by the Eastman Kodak Co. causing the industry to heave a huge sigh of relief. That’s one way to look at the company’s announcement of an agreement with what the Wall Street Journal referred to as a “coalition of studios” for the guaranteed purchase of set quantities of film stock over the next several years. Another way to see the news is as a temporary stay of execution for the medium.

Whether the stay will turn into a permanent reprieve for film depends on many factors not the least of which are the length of the deal, the amount of film stock being manufactured and the continued creative preference of filmmakers. More importantly, it hinges on whether Kodak changes the strategy and approach of its historic motion picture business. If recent maneuvers are any indication, there may be some hope, however slim. Let me explain.

Mandatory Prerequisite Background
No story about the current state of the Eastman Kodak Co. or its future potential would be complete without reviewing the company’s last several years, specifically the time period leading up to and after January 19, 2012. That was the date the 124-year-old company filed for Chapter 11 bankruptcy protection. The adoption of digital imaging and photography both in the consumer and commercial markets devastated Kodak which wasn’t able to modify its business and product lines fast enough. The recent announcement about motion picture film stock finally gives us a little glimpse into the financial damage the company suffered during the transition to digital cinema.

According to Jeff Clarke, who took over as the CEO of Kodak this past March, the sale of motion picture film declined from 12.4 billion linear feet in 2006 to 449 million feet last year. You don’t need a degree from a fancy business school to know that a 96% decrease in revenue is a bad thing. The sale of film stock, once a profitable cash cow for the company, now accounts for under 10% of Kodak’s USD $2.2 billion annual revenue.

Since 2003 Kodak laid off 47,000 employees (and stand at around 8,500), closed 13 manufacturing plants along with 130 processing labs. The industry as a whole went from 260 motion picture laboratories capable of handling film in 2011 to 111 last year. As certain studios ceased the distribution of their releases on 35mm even giants such as Deluxe shuttered their film operations in the United Kingdom and United States, auctioning off their analog lab equipment.

This year Clarke reports Kodak will likely lose money manufacturing motion picture film and hopes to break even in 2015.

Examining The Past To Predict The Future
Much has been written over the past few years about how Kodak wound up in such dire straits despite having survived more than a century as one of the most widely recognized and dominant brands in the world. Most news stories focused on the company’s slow response to the transition toward digital photography. Though this may be true, Kodak may have avoided its financial difficulties if it had spent more time studying not only its own past, but also that of photographic technology which has never remained static for long.

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Daily Cinema Digest – Monday 4 August 2014

Wrong Guardians film screening

Guardian of the Galaxy earned around USD $94 million in the US alone this weekend. But thanks to the wonders of digital (cinema) technology, one set of cinema goers were in for a big surprise when the Regal cinema started projecting a different Guardian film.

Confusing Rise of the Guardians with Guardians of the Galaxy sounds like the kind of mistake my mom might make if she’d ever heard of Rise of the Guardians, but apparently a Regal theater in New Jersey made the same mistake. Leading to hilariously outraged tweets from the theater.

omg they started playing rise of the guardians instead of guardians of the galaxy EVERYONE IN THE THEATRE IS CRYING http://t.co/BOhaCboVsH—
maddie (@thestorysofxr) August 01, 2014

THE BLACK GUY INFRONT OF US WAS LIKE “DO I GET MY POPCORN MONEY BACK TOO” TO THE LADY FUCKCICXJ—
maddie (@thestorysofxr) August 01, 2014  LINK

CinemaBlend has a possible explanation for how this mix-up might have happened:

In the time since this story has gone viral, many projectionists and theater works have spoken up. Apparently, Rise Of The Guardians has been shown recently as part of some children’s matinee clubs. More than likely, someone labeled the digital file in the hard drive as “Guardians”. Then, whoever was cueing up the movie saw Guardians already listed and never bothered uploading the right movie into the system. As a result, when there became a clear problem, there wasn’t an easy solution to fix it, especially since the other midnight screenings were likely full.  LINK

There is an important lesson here about Dcinema naming conventions and no doubt this anecdote will make the rounds at the next ISDCF meeting.

German pirates

Germany – Camcording piracy is down significantly in German cinemas, with interesting examples of pirates caught in the act trying to tape Despicable Me 2 and Wolverine mentioned in the article.

Especially watchful cinema employees – it is thanks to them that the number of illegal camcordings of films in German cinemas has declined significantly since July 2012 . The Society for the prosecution of copyright infringement (GVU) emphasizes this in a press release…

Also in the scene it around this and so the GVU recorded from 24 July 2013 until the end of the year only six current movie titles that ended up as filmed pirated on the Internet; July 2012 to December 2012 the total was 21. Only six illegal camcordings took place after GVU data in Germany in the first half of 2014; in the first six months of 2013 the figure was 13. The number of illegal camcordings in German cinemas declined overall in the year since July 2012 from 34 to twelve back.  LINK

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Daily Cinema Digest – Friday 1 August 2014

Secret Cinema

Great Scott, they did it in the end! Secret Cinema’s delayed Back to the Future event went off yesterday without a problem. The company’s founder had a few words of contrition before the start of the film, as reported in The Guardian.

“I was always confident we would pull this off, thought to be fair I was confident we would open last Thursday and I really pushed the timing. I look back and I think, I made a mistake. When you work in theatre, when you work in events, you are always close to the wire, whatever happens, but this was a massive show. The issues I had with the reports saying that we weren’t ready, well, we were ready to open but the technical aspects – and I think when people come they will really see them, because it’s quite a complex show – were the things we just had to work on.”

He added: “Hands up, Secret Cinema has grown really fast and with this show it was always going to be something quite special, and we had to aim high because I can’t take on a film that is loved to such a degree and not aim high. A lot of people say, well, Secret Cinema is not that secret anymore, but for me the idea is that you build a community of people who like to explore and have adventures and become other characters and live through their favourite films.”  LINK

Secret Cinema Back to the Future

The Guardian even sent along its film reviewer to get his take on the whole experience.

Well, maybe Secret Cinema was having its Eric Stoltz moment: I like to think the delay was an elaborate postmodern joke about the fact that Back To The Future was originally cast with Stoltz in the lead role – an actor who was sacked after five weeks because he wasn’t funny enough – and filming had to start all over again with [Michael J.] Fox.

As a Secret Cinema virgin I found the event engaging and entertainingly bizarre: faux-American and yet very English in all its fancy-dress eccentricity. It isn’t exactly an immersive, wraparound experience – you could get that better by seeing the film at an old-fashioned cinema showing. But it turned into an impressive festival of fan love, a Comic-Con-ish event in which so many audience members dressed up in 1950s clothes which were as authentic as those of the actors employed by the production, that everyone was a co-contributor: it was virtually a user-generated live event.  LINK

But Peter Bradshaw saves his best observation for the penultimate paragraph, and it is one worth highlighting: “I’m not sure exactly what Secret Cinema seriously offers the business of film distribution and exhibition – but in our digital downloading age, we increasingly yearn for live events, real communal happenings, and Secret Cinema caters to that.

China cinema food safety

China – Food safety remains a hot topic in China and cinema concessions are not exempt. Looks like there are quite a few shortcomings, based on this survey by Wenzhou City Market Supervisory Authority and the released ”Wenzhou City in 2014 circulation theater food quality sampling Table”

Recently, Wenzhou City Market Supervisory Authority in Lucheng, Ou Sea, Bay, Ryan and other counties (cities, districts) of the meat market, preserves, puffed food, soy and other special quality to carry out monitoring activities. The random sampling of settled include Wanda Cinema, Cinema of New China, including 20 White Deer Studios theater food distributor sold a total of 83 batches of food, which qualified 58 batches, pass rate 69.88%. Among them, a new era of Movie World, Wanda Cinema, Hang Lung Studios, Yongjia National Theater, Pingyang Studios theater settled within this five dealers sold food subjects were qualified, especially Wanda Cinema, Hang Lung Studios The two theaters, a maximum number of subjects and all batches of food were qualified.

“From the sampling results, the total number of [sample bacterial] colonies failed, the amount of sulfur dioxide exceeded, peroxide value substandard, colorants substandard food distributors theater is settled within several major problems exist in the sale of food.” According to market oversight City Food at the relevant staff of the Authority, said the total number of [sample bacterial]  colonies exceeded easily cause diarrhea and gastrointestinal infections. Sampling of substandard fruit preserves mostly inferior raw materials, some unscrupulous manufacturers to sell to make candied fruit lover, harmful sulfur dioxide added during processing. Part of the informal food manufacturers using peroxide value has exceeded the raw material for the production of edible oil or cooking oil stored improperly or stored too long, the consumer consumption will lead to gastrointestinal discomfort, diarrhea, and even liver damage.  LINK

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